How To Protect Your Posts From Thieves

How To Protect Your Posts From Thieves

Tired of other sites publishing your posts in full?

Don’t feel a link back to you is enough?

Sick of seeing other sites rank in the search engine results above you for your post?

Shocked as hell when you google your post title and find someone else has claimed google authorship of your post?

Concerned that your search engine ranking is going to take a nose dive due to Google’s duplicate content policy?

Well then friend, this post is for you.

We’re going to go over:

  • why you should protect your content.
  • how to protect your content.
  • how to deal with slimy content thieves.
  • a word about creative commons
  • more about DMCA.com

blog-post-stealer

Why you should protect your content.

Besides the obvious fact that someone else is claiming authorship of your post (your hard work), if you’re concerned about your search engine ranking, here’s what google says about duplicate content:

In the rare cases in which Google perceives that duplicate content may be shown with intent to manipulate our rankings and deceive our users, we’ll also make appropriate adjustments in the indexing and ranking of the sites involved.

How to protect your content.

1. Claim your Google Authorship

2. Add a copyright notification to your footer or sidebar. Here’s mine so you can copy and modify it:  All Content on thestrategicmama.com is © Copyright Vanita Cyril – All rights reserved.

3. Apply at DMCA.com for a free or paid account. (there is a WordPress plugin but it hasn’t been updated to compatibility with WordPress 3.7 yet) Be sure to read all fine print. (I haven’t found anything wrong with it, but the fine print is still your obligation)

4. Add a DMCA badge to your footer or sidebar.

New web pages with the DMCA Protection Badge are detected as traffic browses the pages and will appear in the DMCA.com secure Portal Protected pages listing within 48 hours after placing the badge on your website. -DMCA website

5. Watermark your images.

How to deal with slimy content thieves.

1. Email the offender and request they remove your content from their website. Let them know they are violating your copyright located on your site. Site the quote above from Google.

Content thieves are trying to increase the size of their digital footprint, they do not care about building your exposure, they’re not doing you a favor. Some are smart enough to claim their own authorship and then look for sites without a copyright listed. In doing so they’re claiming authorship of your content first. Some are following old school black hat seo tactics. Either way, it’s your content.

2. If there’s no response after 48 hours, initiate a DMCA takedown.

DMCA stands for Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

By initiating a DMCA Takedown, you’re giving the offender notice that under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act they must remove your content from their site.

If the offender aka slimy SOB who’s stealing your content is giving you the brush off, a DMCA takedown will require their hosting provider to get involved.

According to DMCA.com, this is a list of takedown conditions:

  • when copyright infringing content is removed or “taken down” from a website, by the website owner, upon receipt of a DMCA Takedown Notice from their ISP / Hosting company. This notice is generated by the, or on behalf of, the illegally published content owner, distributor, publisher etc.
  • when copyright infringing content is removed or “taken down” from a website by the website owner upon receipt of a DMCA Takedown Notice from the, or on behalf of, the content owner,distributor, publisher etc.
  • when copyright infringing content is removed or “taken down” from a website by the by the ISP or Hosting company of the website that is publishing the infringing content. This occurs because the website owner has not voluntarily complied with a DMCA Notice and the ISP or Hosting company must comply with the Takedown notice.
  • when an infringing website is taken down or “offline” by it’s ISP or Hosting company. This occurs because the website owner does not voluntarily comply with a Takedown notice as described above.

Some may say 48 hours is not enough time to expect a response from the offender. Here’s my response, ignorance is no excuse for stealing. If you did not create the content but still publish it without permission, you’re stealing. Plain and simple. When I catch you, you comply immediately.

A word about creative commons

Creative Commons allows others to copy your content Period

(many do not read the fine print. i didn’t the first time i used it when following the advice of another blogger)

More about DMCA.com

DMCA’s Free Account offers:

  • 1 FREE DMCA Takedown per year if your content is stolen.
  • 10% OFF all Professional Takedown services.
  • Protected page tracking through DMCA .com’s secure Portal.

DMCA’s Pro Account offers (this is the account I have):

  • Up to 10 free takedowns per year. (
    $10 per month Protection Pro – 1 Free takedown per year
    $100 per year Protection Pro – 10 Free takedowns per year)
  • Find copies of your website content online.
  • Generate professional DMCA Takedown notices.
  • Save money by doing DMCA Takedowns yourself.
  • Easily find out who is stealing your content and where it is hosted.

Feel free to ask questions in the comments section. Please be sure to read my disclaimer in the sidebar.

photo credit: © Felix Mizioznikov – Fotolia.com



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